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What Is Anger? – 6 Important Things To Know

In Buddhism, anger is one of the three poisons – the other two are greed and ignorance – that are the primary causes of the cycle of samsara and rebirth. Purifying ourselves of anger is essential to Buddhist practice.

Understanding what anger really is the first step to deal with your anger. Here is something about anger that you may not know. Learn to grow.

1. Anger is Something Created By Yourself.

It’s important to understand that anger is something created by yourself. It didn’t come swooping out of the ether to infect you. We tend to think that anger is caused by something outside ourselves, such as other people or frustrating events. It is not very true.

“No one makes you angry. You make yourself angry.”

2. Anger is Self-Defensive.

Buddhism teaches us that anger is created by mind. However, when you are dealing with your own anger, you should be more specific. Anger challenges us to look deeply into ourselves. Most of the time, anger is self-defensive. It arises from unresolved fears or when our ego-buttons are pushed.

3. Anger is not “REAL”.

As Buddhists we recognize that ego, fear and anger are insubstantial and ephemeral, not “real.” They’re ghosts, in a sense. Allowing anger to control our actions amounts to being bossed around by ghosts.

4. Anger Is Self-Indulgent.

Anger is unpleasant but seductive. There’s something delicious about finding fault with something. Especially when our egos are involved (which is nearly always the case), we may protect our anger. We justify it and even feed it.

5. Express Your Anger Is Only Feeding The Seed Of Anger.

When you express your anger you think that you are getting anger out of your system, but that’s not true. When you express your anger, either verbally or with physical violence, you are feeding the seed of anger, and it becomes stronger in you. Only understanding and compassion can neutralize anger.

6. Allowing Anger Control You Is The Weakness.

Sometimes we confuse aggression with strength and non-action with weakness. Buddhism teaches that just the opposite is true.

Giving in to the impulses of anger, allowing anger to hook us and jerk us around, is weakness. On the other hand, it takes strength to acknowledge the fear and selfishness in which our anger usually is rooted. It also takes discipline to meditate in the flames of anger.

Did you learn something new about anger?

Let me know what you think about this post.

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